Horse Appraisal Expert, Equine Litigation Consultant
3rd Quarter 2014



-HSUS

-Equine Insurance

-Endurance Riding

-Star Award

-Ask the Expert

-NAES Scholarship

-About NAES
Where Does Your Money Go When You Donate to the
Humane Society?
HSUS Each of us has seen the heart breaking commercials by the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) featuring cuddly cats and dogs looking for a new home after a life of abuse and neglect.

But what those commercials don’t tell you is that the HSUS does not run or associate with any local shelters and that less than 1% of your charitable donations will ever reach those adorable pets on your TV screen.
It is this discovery that brought federal charges under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act against the HSUS and similar organizations like ASPCA. In 2012 ASPCA was forced to pay $9.3 million in charges and now HSUS will pay $15.75 million.

Research shows that 71% of Americans believe that HSUS is an “umbrella” group for local pet shelters across the country. This is probably due in part to phrases like, “Our mission is to encourage adoption in your neighborhood and throughout the country. Even though local shelters are trying their best to save lives, they are simply overwhelmed…” which can be found on a series of mailers distributed by HSUS.

With a “mission” like that and pictures of furry kittens the HSUS has been able to accumulate $195 million in assets and operates off an annual budget of more than $100 million. However, tax returns from 2008 show that 0.5% of that budget made it into local hands-on shelters. And 2009 showed only a slight increase to 0.8%. These are the discrepancies that led to RICO charges.

In an attempt to help the average American determine safe places to donate their money The American Institute of Philanthropy rates various organizations seeking donations with letter grades. In 2012 HSUS was given a “D” rating, this was their sixth consecutive “D” they had received.

So where does the money go?

Despite the cats and dogs you see in the commercials, the true focus of HSUS is not animal welfare but instead – “animal rights”. Large portions of their budget go into lobbying for ballot initiatives that target zoos, circuses and family farmers, particularly in the meat and dairy industries.

Unfortunately the true victims are not the kind-hearted people that generously wrote checks to HSUS under false pretenses but instead it is the cats and dogs you see in all the commercials. It is true, local shelters are “trying their best to saves lives,” and “they are simply overwhelmed,” as well as being severely under funded.

Links of interest:

BREAKING: HSUS LOSES CHARITY RATING

CHARITY NAVIGATOR - DOWNGRADES HSUS SCORE

CHARITY NAVIGATOR - THE HUMANE SOCIETY OF THE UNITED STATES




-HSUS

-Equine Insurance

-Endurance Riding

-Star Award

-Ask the Expert

-NAES Scholarship

-About NAES
Equine Insurance: What You Need To Know
Just like you would insure yourself and your family from illness, injury and even death, our equine friends also need similar insurance coverage.
The three most common types of equine insurance are:
  • Mortality – this is comparable to human life insurance, covering death caused by accident, injury or illness. The sum you can receive upon the death of horse can vary from fair-market value to an agreed upon value put into place at the creation of the insurance policy.
  • Major Medical – this type of insurance can be compared to human health insurance, it covers veterinary fees for medical care, diagnostics and/or surgery.
  • Loss of Use – depending on the type of coverage you have you can receive 50-70% of the value of your horse if the animal becomes permanently injured and can no longer fulfill the functions the horse was purchased for.
Rates can vary based on age, breed and discipline of the horse. Horses performing at lower risk sports, such as dressage, tend to have lower rates. Whereas eventers and jumpers tend to have higher rates due to the increased risk of injury.

For those that are responsible for the boarding, breeding and/or training of other people’s horses it is recommended that you have Care, Custody, Control insurance to protect yourself in case a horse in your care becomes sick, injured or dies.
When looking to insure your horse it is best to find an insurance agent who is familiar with your horses breed, field and/or training.

Some insurance providers can even tailor your policy to fit the specific needs pertaining to your horse’s job or in the case of boarders and trainers, the specific needs of their facilities.

Is Your Horse Insurance in place?
(iStock Photo)
This way you can attempt to anticipate any kind of incidents that may cause some kind of legal or financial obligations on your part.

Specialized policies can include things such as trail riding on your property or if your facility hosts events or shows.

Insurance policies not only protect the owners and care takers of horses; they can also help protect new buyers. All policies require an exam by a licensed veterinarian before coverage is granted and since owners are not always obligated to fully disclose a horse’s history when selling it, an insurance policy and the accompanying vet report can tell a new buyer what they need to know when buying a horse.




-HSUS

-Equine Insurance

-Endurance Riding

-Star Award

-Ask the Expert

-NAES Scholarship

-About NAES


From Survival in the Old West to Competition in Modern Day - Is Endurance Racing Safe?
Endurance Riding
(StockPhoto)
During the days of the “Old West” long distance riding was a bit of a necessity. From the slower pace of cowboys and ranchers driving cattle to the faster, longer distances that Pony Express riders endured.

Today we no longer rely on horse and rider to deliver our mail but our need to ride fast and long has changed very little.
Stemming from these old west days with its cowboys and Pony Express riders, endurance riding is arguably the fastest growing equine sport worldwide.

Even though races today take place on mapped out trails with veterinarians and other crew members nearby, these 50 – 150 mile rides are still fraught with the same dangers and concerns that old west riders and their horses encountered.

American Endurance Ride Conference (AERC) has investigated 252,738 ride starts over the last 12 years in which 91 horse fatalities occurred. Their research includes horses that were both directly and indirectly involved in the race itself and horses that died on-site as well as at least two cases of horses euthanized weeks or months later.

AERC divided these fatalities into two groups. The first group is made up of deaths that are associated with the exercise demands of endurance riding, primarily catastrophic colic, which accounted for approximately 79% of the reported deaths.

The second group is made up of fatalities associated with the accidents and dangers of “back country camping”. This included deaths attributed to vehicle collision, corral escapes and separation from riders that left the horses lost and exposed to the elements. An example of the accidents examined in this group is a 2009 incident at the Tevis Cup Endurance Ride, a 100 mile ride in Placer County, California, where ICE JOY, while being led by his rider, stumbled and fell down a slope suffering a fatal skull injury.

Risk factors other than length of the race and trail conditions also affect the health and safety of the horses and their riders.

Factors like the individual horse’s suitability for the sport and its level of conditioning including overriding.

Riders also need to condition and train in preparation for these long rides.

  Endurance Riding
(Wikipedia Photo)
In 2013 about 70 miles into a 100 mile ride, April Moore, an endurance rider, was pulled from the race after she threw up and blacked out. She credited her horse after she received aid saying, “You put a lot of trust in your horse,” in the end when things get tough, “you drop your horses reins and just let him bring you home.”

AERC makes available an Endurance Rider’s Handbook which outlines steps for eliminating or decreasing some of these risk factors. The handbook covers topics from “Selecting an Endurance Horse” and “Feeding the Distance Horse” to “Camping with Your Horse”. It also has chapters on the specific jobs of your crew, if you choose to use one, as well as a supply list and a 12 month conditioning schedule.

Investigating these deaths may help the Veterinary Committee identify and treat diseases caused by endurance riding as well as assisting the Ride Managers Committee to make ride sites safer.




-HSUS

-Equine Insurance

-Endurance Riding

-Star Award

-Ask the Expert

-NAES Scholarship

-About NAES

NAES "Star Award"
The “STAR AWARD” is presented periodically to the attorney or law firm that represents the highest of standards as outlined below:

1. The recipient’s client’s needs always come first.

2. The recipient always makes sure that NAES stays constantly informed of any and all facts and new documents.

3. All invoices are paid in a very timely manner.

4. The recipient listens to both the “good” and “bad” parts of the expert’s thoughts and tries to incorporate them into the case.

5. All deadlines for either written opinions, depositions or any other appearances are communicated in writing to NAES immediately.

6. The recipient is easy to work with and respects what NAES can do to aid the case.

7. The recipient above all, prepares NAES and its expert for depositions and trials feeling that such preparation aids immeasurably in the positive outcome of litigation.

Because the nature of our business does not always lend itself to a regular timing of events, this award is offered on a periodic basis.

The recipient of the award receives a one year’s FREE web site text with logo advertisement.

The award is judged by all members of the NAES staff, since the interpersonal relations with all is so very important.

The Star Award for 2014 is given to attorney Terrence Butler of Beverly Hills, CA. Terry’s biography was sent from his firm and is as follows:

“Terrence Butler is a graduate of The Ohio State University and Southwestern University School of Law.

Terry began his legal career at Kadison, Phelser, Wood, Quinn and Rossi and worked at Hurley, Grassini and Wrinkle before opening his own office in Beverly Hills, California in December 1988.

In addition to serving as a Los Angeles Municipal Court Judge Pro Tem, Terry was an Adjunct Professor of Law at University of West Los Angeles.

NAES Star Award - Terry Butler
(Photograph Provided by
Butler Dodge Law Firm)
He is currently a member the American Trial Lawyers Association, the Consumer Attorneys Of California and the Consumer Attorneys Association of Los Angeles.

After practicing in such fields as personal injury, business litigation, criminal law, bankruptcy, and entertainment law, Terry partnered with Karen Dodge in the mid-1990s. Together they built Butler & Dodge into the respected, specialized firm it is today.”

Questions concerning the award should be directed to Dave Johnson
at 800-575-1669.




-HSUS

-Equine Insurance

-Endurance Riding

-Star Award

-Ask the Expert

-NAES Scholarship

-About NAES
Ask the Expert
My business through the years has been in providing expert testimony and horse appraisals throughout North America. A most common question is what should be done for people who can’t, (or won’t) pay their overdue board bill. Here are some ideas that I guarantee will help in not having to file suit, etc. to get paid:

A. Never let the board bill go for any more than one month. When the bill starts to get high it just looks that much more insurmountable.

B. When first agreeing to board the horse, always make sure the person pays at least the first and last month’s board. It’s so much better for your boarder and you to have a “money cushion” rather than get behind.

C. Make sure the incoming horse has mortality and major medical insurance. The cost of insurance really is not that high and protects the horse’s owner in case something awful happens.

D. I have an attorney friend of mine in Boston who has been able to get the stable’s new boarders to sign a transfer agreement from whichever breed registry represents the boarder’s horse. Naturally, the stable has to assure the new boarder that the signed transfer will be guarded well and only activated should the boarder go longer than six months in arrears.

E. Finally, my experience has shown me that severely overdue boarders seldom get current. So, just face it that you are “stuck” with their horse and most important of all, your state law probably requires you to take care of the horse in the best way possible.

F. Unless you really like the horse, try and get the boarder to take the horse back so at least you don’t have to feed it. You need to deliver the horse for free and pay for your vet to examine the horse and sign off that the animal is perfectly healthy. (All of this must be done with a “smile on your face.”) Call me and I’ll fill you in on true stories about the stable owner that plays “tough.”



NAES

-HSUS

-Equine Insurance

-Endurance Riding

-Star Award

-Ask the Expert

-NAES Scholarship

-About NAES

NAES Scholarship
North American Equine Services is proud to again be awarding an additional scholarship to Ms. Annabella Villanueva of Ahwatukee, Arizona. The following biography was provided by the Villanueva’s.

Annabella Villanueva is a humble, friendly, and hardworking straight-A student in the 8th grade at Summit School of Ahwatukee. Year after year, she has continued to push herself to improve in every single subject taught at this private institution that has an extremely rigorous curriculum and prestigious academic tradition known throughout Arizona. Annabella also enjoys singing and playing club volleyball.

NAES Scholarship
(Photo provided by Heather
and Matt Villanueva)
Last year Annabella gave a presentation to the entire school on the legacy of Pat Tillman and his heroic patriotism and bravery for her course in Social Studies. She recounted that even though Pat Tillman was small for his linebacker position on the football field for the Sun Devils and Cardinals, he made up for it with heart, determination and good old fashioned American hard work.

Annabella recounted to her classmates about how Tillman turned down millions of dollars to fight for a cause that he believed in, and Annabella found his story of sacrifice to be both fascinating and inspiring to her personally.

NAES is proud to sponsor Annabella's education.

NAES




-HSUS

-Equine Insurance

-Endurance Riding

-Star Award

-Ask the Expert

-NAES Scholarship

-About NAES



NAES' Email link

Web site:
www.northamericanequine.com

Address:
North American
Equine Services, LLC
35644 North 11th Avenue
Phoenix, AZ 85086-8704

About Dave Johnson
Dave Johnson, Equine Expert
(Photo Courtesy NAES)

Dave started NAES more than 20 years ago with an eye to making sure all horse owners and those interested in horses could depend on NAES for the straight scoop on horses and valuations.

In addition, Dave is one of the busiest horse activity experts in North America.

Because of his long history of working with so many breeds and disciplines he's called upon to give his opinion in literally hundreds of legal cases and horse appraisals.

Dave is still an active horse show judge and, when time permits, continues teaching at his wife's nationally known stable, Willoway Farm, Inc.,



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